Milk & Two Sugars

Kylie-Ann

Join me, a young graduate, as I take on the graphic design world.

kylie-ann.co.uk

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The Iron Lady,Released January 2012Having watched and enjoyed The Iron Lady, a biographical film of Britain’s only female prime-minister I was saddened by much more than the harsh realities of the onset of dementia. For me a poignant moment came when Margaret Thatcher’s late husband, (as a figment of her imagination) Dennis, pointed her towards his shoe-box of memories and kept cut outs etc. Little cut outs of children’s drawings with “I love you Daddy” scribbled on them, remind the viewer that she did in fact have two children.
The children are rarely featured in the film, which is surprising since she is recounting memories of important moments in her life - with the exception of them running towards the car begging for her to stop when she leaves the house after winning the party-leader election. This along with the absence of her son in her present life, suggests to me a deliberate criticism of Thatcher as a mother. With little reference to her children in the film, it is suggesting little part was played in their uprbringing in the sense that little time would have been available whilst running the country, they most likely had a nanny, much like many children do.
It highlights, to me, a question often on my mind. Can women have their dream job and children? Is it a choice you have to make. I think if your dream job was prime-minister then perhaps it is a definate choice as this is extreme, but possibly illustrates the reason why we haven’t seen a female prime-minister since. 

The Iron Lady,
Released January 2012

Having watched and enjoyed The Iron Lady, a biographical film of Britain’s only female prime-minister I was saddened by much more than the harsh realities of the onset of dementia. 

For me a poignant moment came when Margaret Thatcher’s late husband, (as a figment of her imagination) Dennis, pointed her towards his shoe-box of memories and kept cut outs etc. Little cut outs of children’s drawings with “I love you Daddy” scribbled on them, remind the viewer that she did in fact have two children.

The children are rarely featured in the film, which is surprising since she is recounting memories of important moments in her life - with the exception of them running towards the car begging for her to stop when she leaves the house after winning the party-leader election. This along with the absence of her son in her present life, suggests to me a deliberate criticism of Thatcher as a mother. 

With little reference to her children in the film, it is suggesting little part was played in their uprbringing in the sense that little time would have been available whilst running the country, they most likely had a nanny, much like many children do.

It highlights, to me, a question often on my mind. Can women have their dream job and children? Is it a choice you have to make. I think if your dream job was prime-minister then perhaps it is a definate choice as this is extreme, but possibly illustrates the reason why we haven’t seen a female prime-minister since.