Milk & Two Sugars

Kylie-Ann

Join me, a young graduate, as I take on the graphic design world.

kylie-ann.co.uk

@_kylieann

Rosy Lee’s has been featured in the new publication Top Graphic Design Series: Packaging a three part series showcasing the world’s best graphic design. We are featured alongside the work of top international design agencies - and it’s a hardback book - we’re all very pleased. Thanks Hightone Books. 

Rosy Lee’s has been featured in the new publication Top Graphic Design Series: Packaging a three part series showcasing the world’s best graphic design. We are featured alongside the work of top international design agencies - and it’s a hardback book - we’re all very pleased. Thanks Hightone Books. 

Rosy Lee’s has been featured in the new publication Top Graphic Design Series: Packaging a three part series showcasing the world’s best graphic design. We are featured alongside the work of top international design agencies - and it’s a hardback book - we’re all very pleased. Thanks Hightone Books. 

Animal Inside Out
Natural History Museum
6 April - 16 September 2012

As a stubborn and resistant teenager, I remember the Natural History Museum on a obligatory school trip to be tormentingly dull. Sure, there’s some nice models of animals and casual taxidermy, but with a friend that wouldn’t allow me to take her near the dinosaur exhibition, I was trapped in a textbook of boredom, lacking inspiration. 

This exhibition, however, blew all others out of the water. With over 100 plastinated animals, and some interesting views of their inners, this is one of the most original educational exhibitions I have ever seen. I longed to be the child there, staring at the wonder of plastinated capillaries and elephants inside-out. Although, I’m not entirely sure I would have been able to stomach it.

Gunter von Hagens created the process of plastinating animals (and humans). He injects plastic into the blood stream of a corpse, and dissolves the body in acid, leaving an intricate web of capillaries where the plastic has set. It is the most beautiful sight and despite its rather sinister side, where several dead animals are used for each piece, it is a true wonder.  

Gunter appeared on a Channel 4 documentary called Crucifixion, which used the process within humans to create a Jesus on the cross. Taking you through his process and his thinking in making such a controversial sculpture, it was a gripping programme. I imagine that the final piece was incredible. 

If you like gore, the Hunterian Museum at The Royal College of Surgeons on Kingsway is  definately worth a visit, although not if you’re pregnant. John Hunter had an unhealthy obsession with embryos in jars, although there is some fascinating stuff in there. It’s amazing what formaldehyde can preserve.  


Rosy LeeDevelopmentOur Rosy Lee Tea Pills have had a strong reception on the internet and at various design placement interviews. Yet I have come to realise that the brand identity is weakening what is otherwise a strong and innovative idea. With many people advising us to take these tea tablets to the market, I am keen to develop the branding to something that could actually sell them as an alternative to our usual tea-bag preference. The product has to appeal to a more affluent market, yet still be everyday, as tea pills  would be an everyday need but something that would cost more to produce than say standard granulated tea. It also has to seem natural like normal tea as the form of it being a pill may lead people to think the contrary. The design also needs to convey that these are a speedy and convenient pill form that can get you your tea whenever you want it wherever you are. You could be in Starbucks, and discreetly have your own brew. This is why my initial thoughts are leading to calling it “my tea”. Work in progress. 

Rosy Lee
Development

Our Rosy Lee Tea Pills have had a strong reception on the internet and at various design placement interviews. Yet I have come to realise that the brand identity is weakening what is otherwise a strong and innovative idea. With many people advising us to take these tea tablets to the market, I am keen to develop the branding to something that could actually sell them as an alternative to our usual tea-bag preference. 

The product has to appeal to a more affluent market, yet still be everyday, as tea pills  would be an everyday need but something that would cost more to produce than say standard granulated tea. It also has to seem natural like normal tea as the form of it being a pill may lead people to think the contrary. 

The design also needs to convey that these are a speedy and convenient pill form that can get you your tea whenever you want it wherever you are. You could be in Starbucks, and discreetly have your own brew. This is why my initial thoughts are leading to calling it “my tea”. 

Work in progress. 

Innuendo BoxesA new idea for a fun illustration project based on the fact that people often draw and doodle boxes when they’re sexually frustrated. It could be a book where you could learn to draw sexual boxes or could be a kind of porn for boxes. In its early stages, watch this space. 

Innuendo Boxes

A new idea for a fun illustration project based on the fact that people often draw and doodle boxes when they’re sexually frustrated. It could be a book where you could learn to draw sexual boxes or could be a kind of porn for boxes. In its early stages, watch this space. 

Halls of Residence Signage
Summer 2011

During the Summer, I was asked to design floor signage for a 6 floor halls of residence block in Kingston, London. 

The problem was that the existing brass plated signage was often stolen and kept by the students as halls memorabilia. Designs which involved vinyl on the wall or a painted design where favoured as they wouldn’t be stolen. 

I focused alot of my designs on the fact that the building has been halls of residence since the late 1980s early 90s, and with an increasing popularity of that age of design amongst students (particularly the design students) I felt that the designs would gain respect and not be tampered with. They should be fun and exciting whilst they should also be contemporary and mature. 

Just a ThoughtShould we have a hybrid lane for pedestrians with wheels? After all there’s nothing worse than being stuck behind a granny on a zimmer…  

Just a Thought

Should we have a hybrid lane for pedestrians with wheels? After all there’s nothing worse than being stuck behind a granny on a zimmer…  

The Iron Lady,Released January 2012Having watched and enjoyed The Iron Lady, a biographical film of Britain’s only female prime-minister I was saddened by much more than the harsh realities of the onset of dementia. For me a poignant moment came when Margaret Thatcher’s late husband, (as a figment of her imagination) Dennis, pointed her towards his shoe-box of memories and kept cut outs etc. Little cut outs of children’s drawings with “I love you Daddy” scribbled on them, remind the viewer that she did in fact have two children.
The children are rarely featured in the film, which is surprising since she is recounting memories of important moments in her life - with the exception of them running towards the car begging for her to stop when she leaves the house after winning the party-leader election. This along with the absence of her son in her present life, suggests to me a deliberate criticism of Thatcher as a mother. With little reference to her children in the film, it is suggesting little part was played in their uprbringing in the sense that little time would have been available whilst running the country, they most likely had a nanny, much like many children do.
It highlights, to me, a question often on my mind. Can women have their dream job and children? Is it a choice you have to make. I think if your dream job was prime-minister then perhaps it is a definate choice as this is extreme, but possibly illustrates the reason why we haven’t seen a female prime-minister since. 

The Iron Lady,
Released January 2012

Having watched and enjoyed The Iron Lady, a biographical film of Britain’s only female prime-minister I was saddened by much more than the harsh realities of the onset of dementia. 

For me a poignant moment came when Margaret Thatcher’s late husband, (as a figment of her imagination) Dennis, pointed her towards his shoe-box of memories and kept cut outs etc. Little cut outs of children’s drawings with “I love you Daddy” scribbled on them, remind the viewer that she did in fact have two children.

The children are rarely featured in the film, which is surprising since she is recounting memories of important moments in her life - with the exception of them running towards the car begging for her to stop when she leaves the house after winning the party-leader election. This along with the absence of her son in her present life, suggests to me a deliberate criticism of Thatcher as a mother. 

With little reference to her children in the film, it is suggesting little part was played in their uprbringing in the sense that little time would have been available whilst running the country, they most likely had a nanny, much like many children do.

It highlights, to me, a question often on my mind. Can women have their dream job and children? Is it a choice you have to make. I think if your dream job was prime-minister then perhaps it is a definate choice as this is extreme, but possibly illustrates the reason why we haven’t seen a female prime-minister since. 

Choi’s Gallery Vol. 13 Well Oiled - WastedI am excited to announce that my degree show exhibition piece, “Well-Oiled - Wasted” has been featured in Choi’s Gallery’s most recent graphic design magazine. A full page feature in an international publication, alongside admired deisgn agencies, surely makes for a positive start to post-graduate life. Find out more about Choi’s Gallery Here 

Choi’s Gallery Vol. 13 
Well Oiled - Wasted

I am excited to announce that my degree show exhibition piece, “Well-Oiled - Wasted” has been featured in Choi’s Gallery’s most recent graphic design magazine. A full page feature in an international publication, alongside admired deisgn agencies, surely makes for a positive start to post-graduate life. 

Find out more about Choi’s Gallery Here 

Jacqueline Wilson
Seven Stories Children’s Book Centre
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne
-September 2012

The first book I ever bought was Jacqueline Wilson’s “Double Act”. Bought with a World Book Day token when I was at Junior School it coincided with my first trip inside a book shop and I was overwhelmed. I treasured it. It wasn’t long before I had read it and was off to buy my second: “Bad Girls”. 

I remember the covers distinctly. The partnership of her brilliant story-telling and the playful illustrations of Nick Sharratt was a winning combination, espescially with a young girl, like myself. 

Whilst I was too old, really, to watch Tracey Beaker’s TV series when it came out, having read the books, I can admit to the occassional viewing. It was on CBBC at a time when I should have been chasing boys, spending my days watching music channels and my nights on msn. It was my little secret. Much like a dirty old teddy bear,cherished since early childhood, I kept it to myself.

Jacqueline Wilson is one author I can say influenced my childhood in that she certainly encouraged me to read more. I was one of those children that hung out at the local library alone, whilst adults would look on strangely. Despite this, I felt at home. I can’t help but feel that had I not discovered her brightly coloured book in WHSmith’s that day, things would have turned out differently.  

I was pleased to see, then, that she has an exhibition of her work: manuscripts and momentos at the Seven Stories Children’s Book Centre in Newcastle until next September. Perhaps it will be worth a visit.